The Father

Author

Erlend Bruer

Description

This is a set of instructions for gaining access to the unconscious thoughts and feelings one has towards one’s father.
Psychologically speaking, this game has much in common with projective tests like the Rorschach-test or the Thematic Apperception Test developed by Henry A. Murray. The main difference in method is the usage of a group, rather than an individual, as the entity doing the projection. In this game, three persons use their unconscious and conscious minds to create a tragic story about one of the most important tings in a persons life; the relation to a husband or a father.

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7 thoughts on “The Father

  1. Pingback: Velkommen etter, datatryner. « Rollespill og verden

    • Hi, Nancy! I’m not sure what you want to know. This is a role-playing game, something close to a drama exercise or an improvised story. Does that help?

  2. Pingback: Hey, larpwriters! « Nørwegian Style

  3. Here’s the quick and not so good translation about some review I made about this game some time ago. Matthijs asked me to post it here, so here it is (and sorry for my poor command of English) :

    Clearly this game disturbed me. Although it doesnt look especially “hardcore” and nothing in it made me suspect an intent to go into anything really offensive. It is the other way around : very minimalistic. But anyway, I found it not sane (unsane?). Maybe because I read it the day after my own father’s death first anniversary, but the ineluctability of the murder, the mise en scene with the empty chair, and the author’s clear intent to make something more related to psychanalysis exercise than to a game – he compares it to Rorschah’s test – gave me the feeling of a mix composed of non matching ingredients. On the other hand, I find fascinating that even after having read so many violent and intended-to-be-over-the-top pyschological horror games, it was these three small pages that unsettled me. Only for this, it is worth having a second look at this game. It is good to be shaken about what we take for granted about games.

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